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Battery Recommendations

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I have a 2006 290SCR and I have probably installed 6 batteries in it to this point. Cheap West Marine batteries, an Interstate or two, and I have never replaced all 3 at once. Some people on the dock say you should always replace all the batteries at the same time? My question is this: should I bite the bullett and buy 3 AGM batteries, or maybe 3 Optima batteries as compared to the standard lead-acid? And I have also been told that all 3 batteries must be the same (starting or trolling). It would seem to me that my port and starboard batteries should be the starting type, while my house battery should be a deep-cycle. Just tired of messing with batteries in general and I'm ready to put this puppy to bed before the season starts back up.

Thanks

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All 3 batteries being the same depends on your charger. It should be able to handle different batteries (trolling / starting) of the same type ie AGM / lead-acid etc.. I have 3 Interstate bats in mine, 2 (house) on the same circuit. My house batteries are deep cell and the other battery is a starting type. Been that way since 2008 and all 3 batteries are still very strong. My boat is a 282CR and would suspect that we have the same charger.

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Along the same lines, I just purchased a 2001 Monterey 302CR. I "think" the batteries are shot. The previous owner installed these in 09 but he thought that by charging them with the boat charger all the time would ruin the batteries, he only used the charger ever so ofter. II happened to turn of the battery charger last night and all went dark and the battery gauge read zero.

 

My problem is this. What is the proper switch set up to have the batteries charge? Understand that the shorepower must be on and the battery charger switch must be on also. When I do this and turn off the master switches in the main power access at the rear of the boat, (the one for the port, starboard, parallel, generator) everything goes dark and 12dc indicator gauge in the cabin electrical panel reads zero. Are the batteries being charged or not? It does not indicate if they are. If I look at the front of the charger in the engine room, will that show a charge?

 

Thanks for any comments. Not a new boater, but new to twins and a boat this big. I do learn quickly thank goodness!!

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Along the same lines, I just purchased a 2001 Monterey 302CR. I "think" the batteries are shot. The previous owner installed these in 09 but he thought that by charging them with the boat charger all the time would ruin the batteries, he only used the charger ever so ofter. II happened to turn of the battery charger last night and all went dark and the battery gauge read zero.

 

My problem is this. What is the proper switch set up to have the batteries charge? Understand that the shorepower must be on and the battery charger switch must be on also. When I do this and turn off the master switches in the main power access at the rear of the boat, (the one for the port, starboard, parallel, generator) everything goes dark and 12dc indicator gauge in the cabin electrical panel reads zero. Are the batteries being charged or not? It does not indicate if they are. If I look at the front of the charger in the engine room, will that show a charge?

 

Thanks for any comments. Not a new boater, but new to twins and a boat this big. I do learn quickly thank goodness!!

 

 

Assuming nothing has been altered, your batteries should be connected directly to the battery charger (sometimes with an in-line type fuse)

You are correct the shore power needs to be connected and the battery charger breaker switched on.

It doesn't matter what position the battery switches are in, the charger will be working.

If your batt switches are on, it will take longer to recharge the batts depending on any load you may have on.

 

The 12V indicator meter will always show ZERO if your battery switches are in the OFF position.

 

The 115V AC is independent of the 12V DC system. In fact, if you are hooked up to shore power with the relevant AC breakers switched on, AC power will be available at your outlets, air conditioner etc. even with your DC system off.

 

Most battery chargers these days have indicator LEDS on them showing you what the charger is doing. Yours is 10 years old so yours maybe different. If you don't have an owners manual, see if you can locate one online, or ask here, or some other boating group forums.

 

 

 

Most modern chargers actually have 2 or more stages of charging (the Protech fitted to my 2008 330 actually has 4), to ensure the batteries are not overcharged and remain ‘topped up’ without fear of damaging your batteries AND you can permanently leave your batts on the charger (contrary to what the previous owner believed). If you are using vented or non-sealed batteries, this does require you to keep fluid levels up AND requires you to vent your bilge

 

 

 

Usually, most chargers will not indicate charging amps, capacity, volts etc. whilst charging your batts, only indicating which stage it is in (usually indicated by a series of LED's - on - charge - float (or maintanence) etc. I have however seen this feature in some of the newer models at a few boat shows lately, so I guess will start to filter down over the next couple of years. Chargers have evolved over time, some will even have a 'de-sulphate' phase to 'condition' your batts (for lead-acid types)

 

 

 

Hope this helps some

 

 

 

Regards

 

 

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I have a 2006 290SCR and I have probably installed 6 batteries in it to this point. Cheap West Marine batteries, an Interstate or two, and I have never replaced all 3 at once. Some people on the dock say you should always replace all the batteries at the same time? My question is this: should I bite the bullett and buy 3 AGM batteries, or maybe 3 Optima batteries as compared to the standard lead-acid? And I have also been told that all 3 batteries must be the same (starting or trolling). It would seem to me that my port and starboard batteries should be the starting type, while my house battery should be a deep-cycle. Just tired of messing with batteries in general and I'm ready to put this puppy to bed before the season starts back up.

Thanks

 

 

Optima batteries are AGM type batteries.

I've never used Optima so I can't tell you how they compare to other brands of AGM

 

Charging rates, cycles etc. for AGM are similar to lead-acid and AGM's can work just as a "drop-in" replacement to lead-acids

 

Most modern chargers will have a selection switch for the 3 main battery technologies, namely AGM, flooded (lead-acid) and GEL (which I won’t discuss further).

 

I don't know of any single charger that will allow you to charge different battery technologies at the same time. (If you had 2 separate / individual chargers you could do this)

 

You should use the same battery type for all 3 batteries i.e ALL agm, or ALL flooded, or ALL gel.

You should use 'start' batteries for motors and 'deep cycle' for house batteries.

Most manufacturers of AGM and lead-acid now advertise 'dual purpose' (combining start and deep-cycle). I've not had any experience with these yet but I haven't seen any bad press about them either.

Seeing as your 'start' batteries are never used for 'house' work I don't believe the additional cost of the 'dual purpose' would be justified (it would a different argument if you had an outboard motor with a single battery that was also used as a house battery)

 

I don't believe it is necessary to replace all 3 batteries at the same time.

Certainly it is a good idea (but not necessary) to replace your 2 start batts at the same time. Even though they are effectively separate from each other (unless you use the 'parallel switch' all the time), it stands to reason, if one is giving you trouble it is likely the other might soon too as they obviously do the same amount of work for about the same amount of time under the same conditions.

 

The 3rd (house) should be deep cycle type. It is not (normally) connected to your start batteries, so it has different usage, loads etc. As such, replacement cycle can be considered independent of your start batts

Certainly, if you had 2 house batts connected together, you SHOULD / WOULD replace both at the same time as bad performance in one batt would lower the performance of the other)

 

 

 

6 batteries over 5 years appears to be excessive. You don’t explain any problems but it is worth noting batteries require maintenance even over winter ‘lay-off’ months. You should regularly check fluid levels (lead-acids) and keep them charged to keep them in peak condition.

It might alo be a good idea to have your charging systems checked (battery charger and alternator)

 

 

 

Regards

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Amendment

 

The 12V indicator meter will always show ZERO if your battery switches are in the OFF position.

On the 302 I'm not sure if this is true. It is on my 330SY where I have a separate master DC switch for the house supply

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Thanks for all the comments.

 

I have taken the batteries out and load tested them. All were good and registered 100%.

I have learned that with the Battery master on or off, the batteries will be kept at full charge.

After doing this for awhile, all is normal. They just needed a good charge.

The problem is, if you leave the battery master switch on, is that any draw from the radio, lights,water pump, head, will affect the charge if the draw is large enough. I think that was happening.

I now turn off the master switch therefore nothing but what is left on the shore power is running and not running off the batteries.

 

All is well in the kingdom!!

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Just a quick note.

Even with your battery master switch(es) set to off, your bilge pumps are still connected directly to the battery (via their respective float switches)

You may also find radio memory (to keep your stations set) is also connected in the "off" position

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Just a quick note.

Even with your battery master switch(es) set to off, your bilge pumps are still connected directly to the battery (via their respective float switches)

You may also find radio memory (to keep your stations set) is also connected in the "off" position

 

This is a VERY true statement. Bilge pumps are connected directly (hot) to the batteries to prevent un-commanded sinking.

 

If you do not leave your shore power charging the batteries,

you develop a leak,

bilge pump automatically comes on to get rid of water,

drains battery,

stops pumping,

boat sinks!

 

Wailing can be heard for miles!!!!

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So true! Last August a Regal 27 went down in 6' of water and was a write off. It happened at LaSalle Park in Burlington, Ontario Canada. NO SHORE POWER allowed at this Marina (due to the tree huggers). Bellows(?) "blew" on the outdrive and the automatic bilge kept going until the batteries died, the bilge stopped working and the boat sank. Oil went everywhere and the boat was written off by the insurance comapny as unsalvageable.

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